Knowledge Management with your family

Over this Covid-19 pandemic, I have been looking forward to being able to make those business to business networking connections again and gain more clients. One of the most important thing I have learned from this experience is how Knowledge Management can be done with your family.

The four pillars of Knowledge Management are People, Process, Organizational Culture and Tools. Applying these to your everyday day life can help with a multitude of things from the kids school and activities schedules, bills, doctors appointments, work schedules (yes even when WFH).

The people part of this equation is easy (your family) and each person has a role they play in the family unit. This includes doing the dishes to feeding the animals. Establishing what each person does helps manages what needs to be completed.

Process like it or not is just as important in the business arena as in the home. Processes on how bills are paid, what the approval process is for the kids to be able to get time on their Xbox or electronic devices. Establishing a clear process for your family on how things gets accomplished can help get things done more effectively.

Organizational culture, the family unit is a culture on its own. You have the parental unit(s) as well as the kid(s) and there is a definite cultural dynamic that comes into play on how situations are dealt with on a daily basis.

Tools so how do you keep your family organized, connected and be able to still be able to live. In my home, we utilize Microsoft Office products to include SharePoint and Outlook to keep our documents, bills and other important information where we can collaborate on any decisions that need to be made or have access to our information while we are out in the community. Another tool we use a lot of is whiteboards. I have a Kanban board to monitor my business and we have boards all thought out the house for kids chores, tracking medication, important events and bills. We also take handwritten notes exclusively on Rocketbook notebooks. In terms of our digital meetings we rely on Fireflies to capture audio notes which it does have the capability to transcribe the notes in order to search for information after the fact.

Looking back from the beginning of this pandemic until now, my family and I have gotten closer as well as become better stewards of our Knowledge that each of us has. We are also communicating better as a family.

If you our your company would like to know how Knowledge Management can help improve your business and your bottom dollar. Please feel free to contact me via email at cannonco@cannonco.net or by phone at 620-719-6004.

How to use Knowledge Management to control a pandemic

Since March, I have been asked how can Knowledge Management help me (or my company) to control this or any pandemic. The answer I give them is to treat this pandemic like any other operation your company was in prior to the pandemic but your environment now has some more barriers to overcome before your clients can get to purchase your goods or services.

Part of this is to be aware of the environment we are all facing. Be aware of the trends and where the outbreaks are occurring. A good source of information is the John’s Hopkins University COVID-19 Tracker

Another source of information is the Center for Disease Control where they give advice on how to protect yourself and others from this disease. Also your state and local governments have policies in place to help prevent the spread.

So what are other ways Knowledge Management can help contribute to the larger fight against this particular problem. The work from home or remote work policies for companies need to be reviewed and updated to make sure both quality of service as well as the internal information the employees share can be accessed wherever they are located. Even after this pandemic has run its course, companies should practice how to operate outside of the office spaces. This is something the corporate world can learn from the military.

Having operated in Iraq, Kuwait, Korea, Malaysia, Japan and other areas in the world I can honestly say that the most meaningful take aways were those times we operated outside of the normal headquarters and worked in either a combined environment with the host nation or joint environment with the other services. We all learned from each other and this was also done in remote areas away from the cubicles.

Education in Knowledge Management

Because You Need to Know

Mr. Cannon did a second podcast with Mr. Edwin K. Morris of Pioneer Knowledge Services on the topic of Education in Knowledge Management. In this podcast, Mr. Cannon explains his journey in academia to get training in Knowledge Management.

Listen to Pioneer Knowledge Services – Because You Need To Know With Guest Cory Cannon 2019 by Edwin K. Morris on #SoundCloud or on #Spotify

Interview with Edwin K. Morris

Because You Need to Know

Back in May I was asked to do an interview with Edwin K. Morris, President and Founder of Pioneer Knowledge Services. I had a great time during the interview and you now can hear it on SoundCloud or Spotify

Continue reading “Interview with Edwin K. Morris”

Best Practice for Combined/Joint Meetings: Dealing with multiple classification levels

Sitting in the middle of the Kuwait desert at an undisclosed location. Members of 62 nations came together to pull their resources together against the members of Daesh who were causing havoc within a recovering Iraq and Syria. How did the members of these 62 nations from different backgrounds and culture come together to fend off these rebels out of Iraq and Syria? It was coming together in terms of what each of them can contribute to the effort (money, ground troops, planes, supplies, equipment, intelligence, etc.). These contributions allow the representing nations a certain need to know for issues within their agreed to contribution. A few thousand miles away in Seoul, an Armistice “cease fire” has been going on for the past 65 plus years. There are three separate commands involved with maintaining the Armistice the United Nations Command (UNC), Combined Forces Command (CFC), and United States Forces Korea (USFK). Each of these commands have separate missions but they are all lead by one single U.S. Four Star General it has been this way since 1978. The United Nations Command is composed of 21 sending state nations who provide a representative or resources to the Command. The Combined Forces Command is a bilateral command between the Republic of Korea and the United States military. United States Forces Korea is the joint forces of the United States (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Special Operations) lead for national interest as well as the lead organization under United Nations Command (it is a very unique relationship). As you can see, both situations are similar in terms of how they are structured and the need for maintaining the coalition as well as completing the mission without compromising vital information that would get passed to the advisory (either inadvertently or maliciously). So, the question remains how can a Commander get the vital information they need to make the correct decision at the appropriate time and maintain both the national interest as well as maintaining the coalition. This balancing act can be done through a variety of methods but the one that I have seen most effective is through meeting management. Figure 1 depicts on what the audience should be within the meeting being held. If the information is similar or related, then you can have one meeting starting with inviting all the members of the coalition first and as the information gets more and more restrictive take a short break and excuse those members that are not privileged to the information. This will do two things. First, this construct fosters communication and information sharing with the members of the coalition, thus making all the members of the coalition feel that they have a say n the decision-making cycle. Second, it allows both the Commander and their staff more white space within their calendar to do the jobs they were slotted to perform Table 1 shows an example agenda of how the meeting can be executed. As one can see going through the topics in this manner can save the entire staff time as well as give the decision-maker the information from multiple viewpoints that can affect the mission, the decision and ultimately lives that are out in the front lines implementing these directives. When one develops the architecture for how the meetings will run for a multi-hatted Commander one has to be cognizant of the needs of the coalition, needs of the staff and most of all the needs of the Commander.