Knowledge Management Community of Austin (KMCA)

Austin

Back at the first of the year, I had a meeting with Benjamin Anyacho, a Knowledge Manager from the Texas Department of Transportation, at a local restaurant in Austin. I mentioned to him that we need to pool our collective resources and start having a conversation with other Knowledge Managers within the Austin and Central Texas area.

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the transition of many of us to work from home, we have been delaying the start of this KM Community. After talking with each other for the past few weeks we decided that it is actually a good time to start up and have conversations and possibly share ways we as a community can get to a place of the new normal.

On June 25th at 11:30 AM until 12:30 PM Central Time (in the US and Canada) will start the Knowledge Management Community of Austin (KMCA) Knowledge Cafe. We want to brainstorm with other Knowledge Managers within the Austin and Central Texas community towards a possible knowledge exchange. Knowledge management practice is increasingly becoming a sine qua non for business success. Several smart cities and regions are organizing themselves around KM practice and community.

Please register in advance for this meeting:
Zoom registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUudOCqqjIoGdEdvRJGVonwU84W5DzAQVu1 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
Information on Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/knowledge-management-community-of-austin-area-tickets-106014347768?ref=esli&utm_campaign=201308&utm_source=LinkedInenivtefor001

Benjamin also created a LinkedIn group for this new community of professionals and is located at the following web site: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12436066.

Best Practice for Combined/Joint Meetings: Dealing with multiple classification levels

Sitting in the middle of the Kuwait desert at an undisclosed location. Members of 62 nations came together to pull their resources together against the members of Daesh who were causing havoc within a recovering Iraq and Syria. How did the members of these 62 nations from different backgrounds and culture come together to fend off these rebels out of Iraq and Syria? It was coming together in terms of what each of them can contribute to the effort (money, ground troops, planes, supplies, equipment, intelligence, etc.). These contributions allow the representing nations a certain need to know for issues within their agreed to contribution. A few thousand miles away in Seoul, an Armistice “cease fire” has been going on for the past 65 plus years. There are three separate commands involved with maintaining the Armistice the United Nations Command (UNC), Combined Forces Command (CFC), and United States Forces Korea (USFK). Each of these commands have separate missions but they are all lead by one single U.S. Four Star General it has been this way since 1978. The United Nations Command is composed of 21 sending state nations who provide a representative or resources to the Command. The Combined Forces Command is a bilateral command between the Republic of Korea and the United States military. United States Forces Korea is the joint forces of the United States (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Special Operations) lead for national interest as well as the lead organization under United Nations Command (it is a very unique relationship). As you can see, both situations are similar in terms of how they are structured and the need for maintaining the coalition as well as completing the mission without compromising vital information that would get passed to the advisory (either inadvertently or maliciously). So, the question remains how can a Commander get the vital information they need to make the correct decision at the appropriate time and maintain both the national interest as well as maintaining the coalition. This balancing act can be done through a variety of methods but the one that I have seen most effective is through meeting management. Figure 1 depicts on what the audience should be within the meeting being held. If the information is similar or related, then you can have one meeting starting with inviting all the members of the coalition first and as the information gets more and more restrictive take a short break and excuse those members that are not privileged to the information. This will do two things. First, this construct fosters communication and information sharing with the members of the coalition, thus making all the members of the coalition feel that they have a say n the decision-making cycle. Second, it allows both the Commander and their staff more white space within their calendar to do the jobs they were slotted to perform Table 1 shows an example agenda of how the meeting can be executed. As one can see going through the topics in this manner can save the entire staff time as well as give the decision-maker the information from multiple viewpoints that can affect the mission, the decision and ultimately lives that are out in the front lines implementing these directives. When one develops the architecture for how the meetings will run for a multi-hatted Commander one has to be cognizant of the needs of the coalition, needs of the staff and most of all the needs of the Commander.

Community of Practices Services

One of the many services that Knoco Kansas provides is Communities of Practice Services to organizations these services range from launching a community, gauging the maturity, as well as training and coaching community leaders and facilitators. Communities of Practice are one of the pillars of a solid Knowledge Framework. Many government agencies like the FBI, DoD and NASA have created Communities of Practices ranging from topics as proposed administrative rules and regulation changes to creating entire processes and procedures that are scenario based.

Community of Practice

We help you get your Communities of Practice off to a flying start, through facilitating a one-day or (ideally) two-day launch program. This will be a mixture of introducing the structure and theory of the Community of Practice, and Community of Practice discussions around key topics.

We can check and track the health of your Communities of Practice, through applying a ten-component maturity assessment framework. This Community maturity assessment not only gives you a benchmark to measure development against, but also identified those factors that need the most attention.

We can train your Community leaders and facilitators in the effective operation of Communities of Practice, and how they deliver value to the business, through a combination of theory, case studies, and exercises working on your own Community of Practice issues. 

We can coach your Community leaders and facilitators in building and sustaining their Communities of Practice. Community leadership is a demanding task, and we offer to support the Community Leaders either through regular coaching visits, or through remote coaching through email, teleconferences and Skype.

Below are links to more in depth information on each of these services within Community of Practices please feel free to browse through them if there is any more information you want please feel free to contact me at cory.cannon@knoco.com 

Launching Communities of Practice

Knowledge Management Training Course List

Knowledge Management Coaching